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. suspected boston bomber dzhokhar tsarnaev was charged today with a weapon -- using a weapon of mass destruction and malicious destruction of property resulting in death following three deaths and 180 injured in last week's marathon attack. the criminal complaint includes the description of footage of him leaving a knapsack on the ground where the explosion took place. another similar bomb was found at the site of the watertown shootout. tsarnaev remains in a boston hospital tonight unable to speak because of injuries that include a gunshot wound to his neck. but he's being questioned by authorities already and responding with written answers. in medford, massachusetts, today a funeral was held for 29-year-old victim krystle campbell. in boston, deval patrick and mayor menino requested a moment of silence at 2:50 to mark the one-week anniversary of the bombing. great public servants up there. we begin with those new charges filed against dzhokhar tsarnaev. pete william is nbc's chief justice correspondent. pete, we have charges. >> we do. couple things about the charges. both of the
of a jihadist mentality. the 19-year-old, the one who is still alive, dzhokhar tsarnaev, seems to have been less, i think ideologic ideological, if you will. based on the evidence that we have. and i wonder, frank, there's this idea of mercy in american society. and the "boston herald" in today's paper writes we know he's 19 years old, we don't think he has a criminal record. there are a lot of people out there who seem to have warm, positive things to say about him. to predict he'll get a life sentence is not unreasonable. there are democrats who have said, republicans and democrats who have called for capital punishment in this case. there's a question of whether giving him a lesser sentence, if he does cooperate with authorities, given who he is and how young he is. >> the lesser sentence being life. >> life isn't much of a lesser sentence. it's a pretty satisfying punishment. you know, there's nothing that we can ever do that will, that will make us feel any better about what happened. death penalty versus life -- those are very serious, very, very serious punishments. and you know, there's
. police cornered 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev in a two-hour standoff. he was hiding in a boat in the backtown of a watertown home. he had been shot, he lost a lot of blood. this morning he is in a boston area hospital. at last check he was listed in serious condition. after his capture, massachusetts governor deval patrick and authorities praised police efforts and the community's cooperation. >> it was a very, very complicated case, a very challenging case, and there are still some questions remaining to be answered. but as the colonel said, because of that extraordinary collaboration and cooperation by all of these law enforcement resources and assets and more to the point people, professionals, who brought their "a" game, we have a suspect in custody tonight. >> the community stood strong. it was a call from a resident in watertown. we asked you to remain vigilant, and you did. we got that call and we got the guy. and so we can't thank you enough. you've done everything and more than we've asked. extremely proud of law enforcement today and what we've accomplished. >> this
details today about the suspects in the boston marathon bombing. ja h dzhokhar tsarnaev is listed in serious condition after he was taken into custody. the 19-year-old was found hiding in a boat parked outside a watertown home and there are new suspicions his older brother, who died in the shootout with police early friday morning, could have received terrorist training or support abroad. an official familiar with the matter tells nbc news that a foreign government has expressed concern back in 2011 that tamerlan tsarnaev could have ties to terrorism. the official says the fbi investigated but found no such links and reported the findings back to that foreign government. let's bring in msnbc analyst and former hostage negotiator james cavanagh. james, thanks for joining me again and great work yesterday through all of the mayhem, but i'm curious about the frequency with which we get a warning from a foreign government about someone who is here in our country that potentially has ties to terrorism. >> you know, that stuff does come in to federal agencies all the time really, alex.
who has been all over this story. j dzhokhar tsarnaev will be charged in a civilian court given the debate we have been talking about this this morning. that will be happening to him? >> no question. a policy decision the obama administration has made. he was a american citizen and naturalized last september and now a federal law, the national defense authorization act of 2012 that says american citizens cannot be tried in military commission. so it's not -- this debate is not a question about where he should be tried. the republicans who say he should be treated differently, their claim is that while they understand the civilian trial will go forward, they think he should be treated for now as an enemy combatant and questioned without any question about his rights, without any issue about whether information he gives would be used in his trial, and then turn back over to civilian authorities. but, clearly, the justice department will have none of that. that's not how it's going to go. >> he's in a boston hospital under heavy guard and serious condition including a gunshot wound
purchased, about the video surveillance that led them to dzhokhar tsarnaev, and the purpose is to show the evidence that they have against this guy, and they're going to lay some, but not all, of that out in the fbi affidavit. >> mike, precisely, specifically, what is he likely to be charged with? >> reporter: well, it's going to be terrorism-relatinged charges, and that could include a charge for use of weapons of mass destruction. the ied bombs will be, can fit under that section of the federal code, and that -- that and these other charges could -- would lead to the death penalty, if convicted. doesn't mean that the federal government will seek the death penalty, but these charges could result in the death penalty. we won't know whether the justice department is seeking the death penalty from this criminal complaint charge today. that will come much later. >> let's talk about the wound to the throat we're starting to hear about. that apparently has prevented him from being able to speak. how are interrogators going to get around this? just a simple, they ask questions and he writes
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)